Blackberry and elderflower cocktail

Björnbär och fläder cocktail

Blackberry and elderflower cocktail

A lovely cocktail based on two ingredients which are popular in Sweden, although St Germain liqueur is produced in France! (The non-alcoholic version is a refreshing drink on a warm late summer’s afternoon when blackberries are at their best.) John Duxbury

Summary

Recipe summary for blackberry and elderflower cocktail

Tips

Blackberries being muddled in a glass

• If you’ve not got a muddler (shown being used above), use a fork to mash the blackberries and sugar together.
• If the blackberries are large, halve them and remove the core.
• The berry bits float in the non-alcoholic version but sink in the alcoholic version, so you may prefer to serve the alcoholic version without a straw as it can get clogged up with bits!

Ingredients for the alcoholic version

2-6   blackberries, depending on size
½ tbsp   caster (superfine) sugar
10 ml (⅓ oz) fresh lemon juice, approximately half a small lemon
25 ml (¾ oz) Bombay Sapphire gin
15 ml (½ oz) St Germain liqueur
    soda water

Method

1. Put the black berries in an Old Fashioned glass (whisky tumber/on the rocks glass), add the sugar and muddle until all the sugar is dissolved.

2. Add lemon juice, gin and St Germain.

3. Top up with ice cubes and soda water. Stir thoroughly.

4. Garnish with berries or a slice of lime, as desired.

Ingredients for the non-alcoholic version

3-6   blackberries, depending on size
1 tbsp   caster (superfine) sugar
1 tbsp   fresh lemon juice, approximately half a medium lemon
3 tbsp   fläderblomssaft (elderflower cordial/syrup)
    soda water

Method

1. Put the black berries in a high ball glass, add the sugar and muddle until all the sugar is dissolved.

2. Add lemon juice and elderflower cordial (syrup).

3. Top up with ice cubes and soda water. Stir thoroughly.

4. Garnish with berries or a slice of lime, as desired.

Downloads

 printer version.pdf

  phone & tablet version.pdf

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