Lent buns

Semlor

Semlor, cardamon scented cream buns served in Sweden during Lent

Semlor are cardamon scented buns filled with almond paste and whipped cream. Originally they were only baked on fettisdagen (Shrove Tuesday, Mardi Gras or, literally, Fat Tuesday), but these days bakers in Sweden sell them from mid-January right up until Easter. Freshly baked semlor really are a wonderful treat, so checkout our recipe to see why they are so popular. More…

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Welcome to SwedishFood.com

John DuxburyThank you for visiting our site, set up to help English speakers around the world who would like to learn more about Swedish food.

All our recipes have been tried and tasted, include a clear summary, list ingredients in British and American units and include a photograph of the finished dish.

Happy cooking! John Duxbury

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Online security

Rest assured that this site is completely free to use and we never ask for any personal information. Not only does this protect you, but it also makes the site less likely to be attacked because we have no useful data for cyber thieves to steal!

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New home!

I am very busy following a move to Wales, so please accept my apologies if the site isn't refreshed as frequently as normal or you experience a delay in getting a reply to any email you send.

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Cinnamon buns

Kanelbullar

A basket of freshly baked Swedish cinnamon buns

Kanelbullar (Cinnamon buns) are probably Sweden's most popular bun and available at every café and bakery in Sweden. We have two recipes: one with a classic filling and the other is Edd Kimber's sweeter cinnamon-rich filling. More…

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Meatballs

Köttbullar

A dish of freshly cooked Swedish meatballs

Köttbullar (meatballs), despite not always enjoying the best of reputations, we think that when well made they are hard to beat. Of course, our recipe is the best and will ensure that your köttbullar really are Swedelicious!

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To enjoy good köttbullar it is important that they are served with gräddsås (cream sauce), pressgurka (pressed cucumber), rårörda lingon (sweetened lingonberries) and potatismos (mashed potatoes). More…

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Chocolate balls

Chokladbollar

Chocolate Balls on a plate

Chokladbollar (chocolate balls) appear on most restaurant menus in Sweden and, although you normally only get one ball, it is a rather good way of finishing a meal. Chocolate balls are also nice to make at home. They are one of the easiest treats around and they taste wonderful! There is no baking involved so they are a great recipe to make with kids. Unlike in a Swedish restaurant, you can also then expect to have more than one. More… 

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Cod with horseradish

Torsk med pepparot

Cod with horseradish and browned butter

Swedes combine fish and horseradish so frequently that many fishmongers in Sweden stock fresh horseradish. It really is a delicious combination and when combined with brown butter I don’t think there is a better way of cooking cod.

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If you can find it, use skrei a migratory cod from Norway. Skrei is only available for a limited season from January to April when the fish swim from the Barents Sea, inside the Arctic Circle, to their spawning grounds just off the Lofoten Islands. The flavour and texture are superb! More…

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Pea soup

Ärtsoppa

Swedish pea soup

Yellow pea soup is an absolute classic in Swedish food and is perfect at this time of year after all the rich Christmas food.

It has been served in Sweden since the middle ages! Traditionally it was served on Thursdays to get people ready for the Christian fast which would begin on Fridays. Even today it is still often served on Thursdays in schools and always in the army and the navy.

It is very close in taste and texture to pease pudding, a famous traditional British dish, much loved by my mother. In other words it is quite mealy, but if you would like it to be more soupy just add a little more stock.

In Sweden it is made with salted pork belly, essentially unsliced streaky bacon, but as this is almost impossible to buy I recommend using an unsmoked ham hock instead. More…

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Sourdough bread in 3 days

Surdegsbröd på 3 dagar

A loaf of white sourdough bread, fermented for 3 days

This is my favourite white sourdough recipe! Three days may seem a long time before you actually have anything to eat, but I think the wait is worth it!

Essentially the method is the same as the "one-day" method, but the dough is refrigerated a couple of times, which improves the flavour slightly and makes the dough easier to handle. I particularly recommend this method if:
• You want freshly baked bread on a day when you are busy most of the day,
• You want freshly baked sourdough bread for lunch,
• Your kitchen is too hot, so you are worried about your dough being over-proved,
• You have had difficulties getting consistent results with the "one-day" method.
The disadvantages of this method are that you need to find space for the dough in your fridge and, of course, you've got to plan ahead! More…

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Seeded rye bread

Rågbröd med frön

Seeded rye bread

Rågbröd (rye bread) is very popular in Sweden. When thinly sliced it is perfect with cheese or topped with salmon or prawns. This version uses sunflower seeds and golden linseed as well as cracked rye and wheat to give it a fabulous nutty texture. It’s a really tasty loaf to be enjoyed slowly! Don’t worry it is not dry, it keeps well and it has a fabulous dark crust. More…

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2017 Calendar

2017 Almanacka

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For a calendar of the main festivals and food events in Sweden to look forward to during 2017, as well as a complete list of all namnsdagar (name days), click here.

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Top 20 Recipes

Top 20 Recept

Top 20 Swedish recipes during 2016

Kanelbullar (cinnamon buns) was our most popular recipe last year with köttbullar (meat balls) in second place and cholkladbollar (chocolate balls) in third place. For details of all our Top 20 Recipes click here.

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Distinctive features of Swedish food

Swedish food has seven key distinctive features

Swedish food has a growing reputation across the world. For instance, Jamie Oliver described Swedish food as "Big, bold, brave and definitely up there with the best in the world". But what makes Swedish food distinctive? Check-out our guide…

A collage of our Top 50 classic SSwedish recipes

We have compiled a list of what we consider to be our Top 50 Classic Recipes. No two people are likely to agree completely on what should be included, but we hope you will approve of most of our choices!

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I am are gradually producing a Swedishfoodpedia. Essentially this is a series of articles about food related events in Sweden and Swedish ingredients, especially those that might not be familiar to most readers. I have already assembled articles on many topics including:

cloudberries (wonderful golden berries that grow in the north of Sweden),
fika (a "proper" Swedish coffee break),
• lingon (lingonberries, an essential accompaniment to many Swedish dishes),
surströmming (stinky fermented herring),
Västerbottensost (the king of Swedish cheeses),

Many other articles are in the pipeline, but if there is anything you would like to know more about please let me know. To read existing articles click here.

Sweden's news in English

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For Sweden's news in English visit TheLocal.se. The site is updated 24/7 and has more than 4 million readers worldwide. If you hit the 'Register' button on their website they will send you a weekly newsletter summarising the week's Swedish news as well as links to various features. Take me to TheLocal.se.

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SwedishFood.com

SwedishFood.com is run by a not-for-profit company set up to help English speakers around the world who would like to learn more about Swedish food. If you like the site please help us to promote it and bring Swedish food to a bigger audience by following us on:

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John Duxbury
Editor and Founder